Tag Archive for: Metabolic syndrome

IMPORTANCE OF BONE HEALTH

Bone health refers to the strength and density of bones, which can be affected by factors such as diet, physical activity, and hormonal changes. As we age, our bones naturally lose density and become more fragile, making them more susceptible to fractures. It is important to focus on bone health as we age to reduce the risk of bone fractures and osteoporosis, a condition in which the bones become so weak that they can break from a minor fall or even from everyday activities.

An evidence-based approach to maintaining bone health includes:

  • Weight-bearing and resistance exercises
  • Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D
  • Avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption
  • Medications such as bisphosphonates and Denosumab are for those at high risk or with established osteoporosis.

It is also important to have regular bone density screenings, especially for those who are at high risk for osteoporosis, such as postmenopausal women and older men.

 

ROLE OF DIET FOR BONE HEALTH

Diet plays a crucial role in maintaining bone health. Adequate intake of certain nutrients, such as calcium and vitamin D, is essential for maintaining bone density and reducing the risk of osteoporosis.

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and is a key component of bone. Likewise, Vitamin D is also necessary for the body to absorb and use calcium. The recommended daily intake of vitamin D for adults is 600-800 IU/day. Good dietary sources of vitamin D include fatty fish, fortified dairy products, and eggs. Sunlight is also a natural source of vitamin D, but it is important to be aware that excessive sun exposure can increase the risk of skin cancer.

Research has shown that a diet that is high in protein, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin K2 also helps to maintain bone health. While a diet that is high in processed foods, added sugars, and sodium can negatively impact bone health. Excessive alcohol consumption and smoking also hurt bone health.

Overall, an evidence-based approach to maintaining bone health through diet includes:

  • Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D
  • Consuming a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and lean protein
  • Limiting processed foods, added sugars, and sodium
  • Avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption

 

SIGNIFICANCE OF CALCIUM:

Calcium supplements are often recommended for individuals who do not consume enough calcium in their diet or those at high risk for osteoporosis. However, it is important to note that the best source of calcium is through diet.

The recommended daily intake of calcium for adults is 1000-1200 mg/day for men and women up to age 50, and 1200-1500 mg/day for women over 50 and men over 70. Good dietary sources of calcium include dairy products, leafy green vegetables, and fortified foods such as cereal and orange juice.

Supplementing with calcium can be beneficial for some people, but it’s not always necessary. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional to determine if calcium supplements are appropriate for you and to assess the optimal dosage.

Calcium supplementation is effective in increasing bone density and reducing the risk of fractures in older adults, especially in those with low dietary calcium intake, however, excessive calcium intake can lead to health issues such as kidney stones and cardiovascular disease.

 

SIGNIFICANCE OF VITAMIN D:

It’s also worth noting that calcium alone is not enough to maintain optimal bone health, vitamin D is also necessary for the body to absorb and use calcium, so it’s important to have an adequate intake of both nutrients.

In summary, while calcium supplementation can be beneficial for some individuals, it’s important to first aim to get enough calcium through diet and to consult with a healthcare professional to determine if supplements are necessary. It’s also important to ensure adequate intake of vitamin D and other bone-supportive nutrients, as well as engage in regular physical activity and avoid smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.

 

ROLE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN BONE HEALTH  

Physical activity plays a crucial role in maintaining bone health. Weight-bearing and resistance exercises can help to increase bone density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

Weight-bearing exercises, such as walking, running, stair climbing, and dancing, put stress on the bones and stimulate bone growth. Resistance exercises, such as weightlifting and resistance band exercises, also put stress on the bones and can increase muscle strength, which can help to reduce the risk of falls and fractures.

Aerobic exercises, such as cycling and swimming, are not weight-bearing, but they have other health benefits such as cardiovascular health, balance, and flexibility.

There is a significant amount of research that supports the benefits of physical activity on bone health. A meta-analysis of over 100 studies found that physical activity is associated with increased bone density in both children and adults. Another study found that regular weight-bearing exercise can reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures in postmenopausal women.

Physical activity is also beneficial for maintaining balance and coordination, which can help to reduce the risk of falls and fractures in older adults. It is important to note that the amount and type of physical activity needed to maintain bone health can vary depending on an individual’s age, sex, and baseline bone density. It is best to consult with a healthcare professional to determine an appropriate exercise program that is tailored to your needs. Overall, regular physical activity, including weight-bearing and resistance exercises, plays a crucial role in maintaining bone health and reducing the risk of osteoporosis.

 

INTERESTING FACTS RELATED TO DIET AND BONE HEALTH 

Here are a few interesting facts on how milk is not the richest source of calcium-

  1. Leafy green vegetables: Spinach, kale, and collard greens are all excellent sources of calcium, with one cup of cooked spinach providing about 245 mg of calcium, which is more than a cup of milk (240 mg).
  2. Fortified foods: Many non-dairy foods are fortified with calcium, such as fortified orange juice, cereal, and plant-based milk alternatives.
  3. Nuts and seeds: Almonds and sesame seeds are both good sources of calcium, with a quarter cup of almonds providing about 75 mg of calcium and 2 tablespoons of sesame seeds providing about 130 mg of calcium.
  4. Fish with bones: Sardines and salmon with bones are also rich in calcium, with a 3-ounce serving of canned sardines providing about 325 mg of calcium and a 3-ounce serving of canned pink salmon with bones providing about 181 mg of calcium.
  5. Legumes: Some legumes, such as navy beans, black-eyed peas, and soybeans, are also good sources of calcium. A cup of cooked navy beans provides about 126 mg of calcium.

 

MYTHS AROUND DIET AND BONE HEALTH MAINTENANCE –

 

There are many nutrition myths when it comes to bone health. Here are a few examples:

 

  1. High-protein diets leach calcium from bones: There is no evidence to support the idea that a high-protein diet causes calcium to be leached from bones. A diet that is high in protein may be beneficial for bone health, as protein is necessary for the formation and maintenance of bone.
  2. Drinking milk will prevent osteoporosis: While milk and dairy products are good sources of calcium, they are not the only sources of calcium. Consuming a diet that includes a variety of calcium-rich foods, as well as other bone-supportive nutrients such as vitamin D and K2, is important for maintaining bone health.
  3. Only postmenopausal women need to worry about osteoporosis: Osteoporosis is a disease that can affect anyone, regardless of age or sex. While postmenopausal women are at a higher risk, everyone needs to take steps to maintain bone health throughout their life.
  4. Supplements are better than food sources of calcium: Supplements can be beneficial for some individuals, but it’s important to first aim to get enough calcium through the diet. Food sources of calcium also provide other important nutrients that are beneficial for overall health.
  5. Eating too much salt can lead to osteoporosis: While a diet that is high in salt can lead to high blood pressure and other health problems, there is no evidence to support the idea that salt causes osteoporosis.

Conclusion:

In summary, by following an evidence-based approach that includes a healthy diet, regular physical activity, adequate intake of bone-supportive nutrients, and avoiding risk factors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, you can reduce your risk of osteoporosis and maintain optimal bone health as you age.

Metabolic syndrome (or MetS) is both a condition and a symptom. To start with, MetS is a group of conditions that affect the body’s normal biochemical balance. Abnormalities such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, excess abdominal fat, high triglycerides, and low HDL cholesterol are all part of the syndrome. In this article, we’ll try and explain the syndrome in detail, what are all the possible causes and how to actually tackle it with a proper diet plan and a healthy lifestyle.

Causes and indicators – How to know if you have metabolic syndrome?

If you take the syndrome apart and look at the conditions individually, you’ll notice one thing. Most of them do not have an on-the-face symptom pallette and the only way to know for sure that you have the condition is by monitoring it and taking readings. Here are a few solid indicators.

  1. Blood pressure: systolic > 130 and/or diastolic > 85 mmHg or drug treatment
  2. Fasting glucose: >100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) or drug treatment
  3. Triglycerides: >150 mg/dL (1.7 mmol/L) or drug treatment
  4. High-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol: <40 mg/dL (1 mmol/L) (male) or <50 mg/dL (1.3 mmol/L) (female) or drug treatment.

Please monitor your blood pressure, glucose levels, and cholesterol levels at regular intervals. A few of the common causes for these conditions are obesity – especially an overinflated waist, physical inactivity, genetics, predisposed insulin resistance, and consuming more calories than expended for a very long time.

Complications that come with MetS

Metabolic syndrome is not simply a group of conditions put together for diagnostic or treatable simplicity. These conditions are extremely serious and their complications as individual conditions are bad enough already, but if they’re diagnosed as a cluster it puts the person at a much higher risk. Atherosclerosis or the hardening of arteries is one of the major problems with MetS. Why? Then it leads to all the complexities that are the result of a blockage in arteries, like stroke, cardiovascular illnesses, peripheral artery disease, heart attack, and a lot more.

If tackled right, the severity and the aftereffects of the metabolic syndrome-related complexities can be reduced greatly. What do we mean by tackling metabolic syndrome though?

How to handle metabolic syndrome?

As nutritionists, we’ve always believed that a well-researched diet can lay down a solid foundation to deal with any bodily anomaly. Metabolic syndrome is no different. Here are a few things that a MetS friendly diet must have, and mustn’t.
First things first, a high fiber diet has a lot of positive impacts on several metabolic disorders such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, heart diseases, and colon cancer. So loading your diet up with plant-based fiber is highly recommended.

When it comes to fat, make sure to consume 30% of the total calorie intake per day in the form of fat. However, consumption of saturated fat is generally discouraged and should not make more than 10% of your total energy consumption. So, a diet low in saturated fat but high in monounsaturated fat can bring balance to your cholesterol levels.

As far as other components of your diet are concerned, a lot of complex carbohydrates from legumes, food that’s rich in Omega-3-fatty acids, and potassium are all good additions to have in your diet. Sodium and simple sugars are generally discouraged.

Sweat it out

To complement this nutrition-rich diet, you’ll also have to put yourself through moderately intense exercises, for at least 30 to 60 minutes a day for most weekdays. Monitor yourself, and how your physique reacts to different workout routines, and stick to the one that’s most effective. This combination of a sound diet and a solid workout pattern will bring your vitals to their optimal performance, and you can see the indicators that we spoke about earlier resetting towards their optimal values gradually. You’ll also have to listen to your physician and continue medications as well, whatever is appropriate.

We hope that your understanding of the metabolic syndrome and how to deal with it has become a little better. If you’re finding it difficult to find the right diet plan for you, we recommend you have a talk with our team of experts, and we’ll help you in any way we can!

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